“It’s not real Ham Radio!” by Chris G7DDN

(This a a bit of a long read, but it opens up a lot of questions where this hobby is going these days.  Comments are open on this – what’s your opinion?)

A Pioneering Background

I was musing recently on the wonderful history of Amateur Radio, from the early pioneers with spark transmitters and the race to get the first signals across the Atlantic, up to the Microwave enthusiasts who developed the way forward for space communications and satellite technology (and, whisper this, mobile phone technology!) Continue reading

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Bad news from the Bouvet DXpedition team

First let’s start with the following chain of events.

On January 31st, at 0600z, the team announced that they have arrived at Bouvet! There was fog and freezing rain that greeted them. Later that day, at 1500z, Ralph, K0IR, reported: Bouvet Island came into view at about 0600 UTC today. Continue reading

Cell phones might not work after a strong earthquake, say Vancouver radio operators

‘Ham’ radio volunteers in Vancouver would provide emergency communications in the event of an earthquake or other natural disaster Imagine there has just been a strong earthquake. You are desperate to contact your family to make sure they are safe. You reach for your cell phone, but are greeted with a busy signal. That’s exactly […]

via Cell phones might not work after a strong earthquake, say Vancouver radio operators —

Tiny LF Signal Makes the Hop from Newfoundland to the UK

 

For Joe Craig, VO1NA, in Torbay, Newfoundland, things have been pretty exciting lately on VLF (very low frequency). He’s among the early MF, LF, and VLF experimenters in North America — active even before Canada allocated Amateur Radio bands in that part of the spectrum. He believes he accomplished a “first” for a Canadian radio amateur on October 22, when his very VLF, very QRP signal on 8.27 kHz (that would be the 36-kilometer band) was copied in the UK. Continue reading

SIM31 For The Digital Folks Out There

I discovered a relatively new mode last week.  It’s called SIM 31.  It’s an extension of PSK but I kinda look at as a cross between PSK and JT65.  With Sim31 and its preselected macros you can set it to auto pilot and let it do its thing.  It will answer a CQ call do two rounds and sign off.   There’s also a manual key where you can start typing just like in PSK. You also don’t need to worry about language barriers as you select which language you wish to use and translations are done for you.  The software is free and the setup is rather painless. Continue reading