Bad news from the Bouvet DXpedition team

First let’s start with the following chain of events.

On January 31st, at 0600z, the team announced that they have arrived at Bouvet! There was fog and freezing rain that greeted them. Later that day, at 1500z, Ralph, K0IR, reported: Bouvet Island came into view at about 0600 UTC today. Continue reading

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23 CM Homebrew Antenna For SOTA Purposes

I’m enjoying the challenge of 23cm 1296 MHz homebrew antenna construction for SOTA purposes. My 23cm portable antenna collection includes: 12el DL6WU Yagi 12dB gain – lightweight boom construction using a folded dipole; 6el DL6WU Yagi 9 dB gain – ruggedised all brass construction gamma matched, ideal for the Australian scrub bash; and 2el HB9CV […]

via Construction of a 23cm 1296 MHz Bi-Quad Antenna — Get out of the Radio Shack and Live Life

Geomagnetic storm predicted

NOAA forecasters say there is a 50% chance of G1-class geomagnetic storms on Jan. 1st when a high-speed stream of solar wind engulfs Earth’s magnetic field.

G1 storms are relatively minor, having little effect on satellites and power grids. However, they can spark intense auroras around the Arctic Circle and may disorient animals that use magnetic cues for navigation at high latitudes.

Visit Spaceweather.com for more information and updates.

(As seen on Southgate ARC)teur

A hole in the Sun’s atmosphere turns toward Earth

Spewing a stream of solar wind as fast as 700 km/s (1.6 million mph), a hole in the sun’s atmosphere is turning toward Earth.

Forecasters expect the stream to reach our planet on June 15th or 16th with a 40% chance of minor G1-class geomagnetic storms when it arrives.

High-latitude sky watchers should be alert for auroras in the nights ahead, especially in the southern hemisphere where deepening autumn darkness favors visibility.

Visit Spaceweather.com for more information and updates.

(As seen on Southgate ARC)

The sun’s magnetic dynamo is weakening

Bruce Dorminey, writing on Forbes, says that astronomers now confirm that the Sun’s magnetic dynamo is likely to eventually disappear causing our star to lose its 11 year magnetic cycle

In fact, a billion years from now, they say, interplanetary spaceflight could become even more treacherous, since the Sun’s protective magnetic heliosphere would weaken or even disappear, leaving our solar system unshielded from incoming cosmic rays.

In a paper submitted to the journal Solar Physics, co-author Travis Metcalfe confirms that the Sun, a yellow dwarf (G-spectral type) star is indeed making a long term transition in its magnetic activity cycle.

Over the next one to two billion years, we have confirmed that the Sun’s magnetic cycle period will get longer before disappearing entirely.

Read the full story

thanks to Southgate ARN